Salary Differences Between Schools of Medicine and Schools of Public Health for Nonclinical PhD Faculty: A Case Study of One Large Multicampus University System

Denny Fe G. Agana-Norman, Michael A. Hansen, Roger J. Zoorob, Winston Liaw, Jason L. Salemi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There are no evidence-based findings to assist professionals with advanced public health and social science degrees in choosing the appropriate academic location. A cross-sectional case study in 2019 was conducted using publicly available online data of full-time, nonclinical, doctoral-level academic faculty in schools of public health (SOPHs) and schools of medicine (SOMs), within one large university system. Analyses included descriptive statistics and generalized linear regression models comparing salaries between school types by academic rank, after gender and race/ethnicity adjustment. The study included 181 faculty members, 35.8% assistant, 34.1% associate, and 30.1% full professors. After accounting for race/ethnicity and gender, SOM assistant and associate professors had 9% (P =.03) and 14% (P =.008) higher mean salaries than SOPH counterparts. Findings suggest slight salary advantages for SOM faculty for early- to mid-career PhDs in one university system. Factors such as start-up packages, time to promotion, and grant funding need further exploration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E96-E99
JournalJournal of Public Health Management and Practice
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • PhD
  • academic rank
  • medicine
  • public health
  • salaries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

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