Rhesus macaques show increased resistance to repeated SHIV intrarectal exposure following a heterologous regimen of rVSV vector vaccine expressing HIV antigen

Joseph Jelinski, Monika M. Kowatsch, Marc Alexandre Lafrance, Alice Berger, Jannie Pedersen, Hiva Azizi, Yue Li, Florine Scholte, Alejandro Gomez, Natasha Hollett, Toby Le, Matthew Wade, Hugues Fausther-Bovendo, Marc Antoine de La Vega, George Babuadze, Ara XIII, Claude Lamarre, Trina Racine, Chil Yong Kang, Xiao Jian YaoGalit Alter, Eric Arts, Keith R. Fowke, Gary P. Kobinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic continuing worldwide for 40 years, no vaccine to combat the disease has been licenced for use in at risk populations. Here, we describe a novel recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) vector vaccine expressing modified HIV envelope glycoproteins and Ebola virus glycoprotein. Three heterologous immunizations successfully prevented infection by a different clade SHIV in 60% of non-human primates (NHPs). No trend was observed between resistance and antibody interactions. Resistance to infection was associated with high proportions of central memory T-cell CD69 and CD154 marker upregulation, increased IL-2 production, and a reduced IFN-γ response, offering insight into correlates of protection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2251595
JournalEmerging Microbes and Infections
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

Keywords

  • HIV
  • IFN-γ
  • NHP
  • T-cell
  • immunodeficiency
  • prophylaxis
  • vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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