Racial variation in toll-like receptor variants among women with pelvic inflammatory disease

Brandie D. Taylor, Toni Darville, Robert E. Ferrell, Roberta B. Ness, Catherine L. Haggerty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Racial disparities exist in gynecological diseases. Variations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes may alter signaling following microbial recognition.Methods. We explored genotypic differences in 6 functional variants in 4 TLR genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR6) and the adaptor molecule TIRAP between 205 African American women and 51 white women with clinically suspected pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). A permutated P <. 007 was used to assess significance. Associations between race and endometritis and/or upper genital tract infection (UGTI) were explored. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Results. The TT genotype for TLR1 rs5743618, the GG genotype for TLR1 rs4833095, the CC genotype for TLR2 rs3804099, the TLR6 rs5743810 T allele, and the CC genotype for TIRAP rs8177374 significantly differed between races (P <. 007). African American race was associated with endometritis and/or UGTI (OR, 4.2 [95% CI, 2.0-8.7]; P =. 01). Among African Americans, the TLR6 rs5743810 T allele significantly decreased endometritis and/or UGTI (OR, 0.4 [95% CI,. 2-.9]; P =. 04). Additionally, rs5743618, rs4833095, and rs8177374 increased endometritis and/or UGTI, albeit not significantly.Conclusions. Among women with PID, TLR variants that increase inflammation are associated with African American race and may mediate the relationship between race and endometritis and/or UGTI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)940-946
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume207
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae
  • Toll-like receptors
  • inflammation
  • pelvic inflammatory disease
  • race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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