National department of defense surveillance for invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae: Antibiotic resistance, serotype distribution, and arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction analyses

M. K. Hudspeth, T. C. Smith, C. P. Barrozo, A. W. Hawksworth, M. A.K. Ryan, G. C. Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To provide surveillance among US military personnel and their beneficiaries, 157 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates were collected systematically from 7 large military hospitals between August 1997 and August 1999. The isolates were studied for antibiotic resistance, and 120 were serotyped and subjected to arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Fifty (31.9%) of 157 isolates had intermediate or high-level resistance to penicillin, and 15.9% had multidrug resistance. The most common serotypes were 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 19F, and 23F. Those serotypes associated with penicillin resistance were 6B, 9V, 19A, and 19F. Most invasive disease cases were caused by serotypes included in the currently available 23- and 7-valent pneumococcal vaccines. By use of AP-PCR, 4 DNA groups were correlated with health care site (P ≤ .0001). These results are valuable in assessing appropriate use of antibiotics and vaccines against S. pneumoniae in both military personnel and their families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)591-596
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume184
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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