Assessment of the Risk of Exotic Zika Virus Strain Transmission by Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus from Senegal Compared to a Native Strain

Alioune Gaye, Cheikh Fall, Oumar Faye, Myrielle Dupont-Rouzeyrol, El Hadji Ndiaye, Diawo Diallo, Paolo Marinho de Andrade Zanotto, Ibrahima Dia, Scott C. Weaver, Mawlouth Diallo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Zika virus (ZIKV) shows an enigmatic epidemiological profile in Africa. Despite its frequent detection in mosquitoes, few human cases have been reported. This could be due to the low infectious potential or low virulence of African ZIKV lineages. This study sought to assess the susceptibility of A. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus to ZIKV strains from Senegal, Brazil, and New Caledonia. Vertical transmission was also investigated. Whole bodies, legs/wings and saliva samples were tested for ZIKV by real-time PCR to estimate infection, dissemination and transmission rates as well as the infection rate in the progeny of infected female A. aegypti. For A. aegypti, the Senegalese strain showed at 15 days post-exposure (dpe) a significantly higher infection rate (52.43%) than the Brazilian (10%) and New Caledonian (0%) strains. The Brazilian and Senegalese strains were disseminated but not detected in saliva. No A. aegypti offspring from females infected with Senegalese and Brazilian ZIKV strains tested positive. No infection was recorded for C. quinquefasciatus. We observed the incompetence of Senegalese A. aegypti to transmit ZIKV and the C. quinquefasciatus were completely refractory. The effect of freezing ZIKV had no significant impact on the vector competence of Aedes aegypti from Senegal, and vertical transmission was not reported in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number130
JournalTropical Medicine and Infectious Disease
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • A. aegypti
  • Brazil
  • C. quinquefasciatus
  • New Caledonia
  • Senegal
  • Zika virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Immunology and Microbiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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