Antibiotic Stewardship and Inpatient Clostridioides difficile Testing in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: The Need for Multilevel Checks and Balances

Michael Kueht, Ahmad Kharsa, Muhammad Mujtaba, Rupak Kulkarni, Rachel Britt, A. Scott Lea, Ghani Hafiz, Jeffery Fair, David Reynoso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Diarrhea among recipients of solid organ transplants is a commonly encountered problem and is often multifactorial in etiology. Owing to the combination of perioperative antibiotic administration and the immunosuppressed status of transplant recipients, a high degree of suspicion for Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile) colitis is prudent. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the association of an institutional integrated stewardship program with C. difficile testing practices after abdominal solid organ transplantation. Methods: Starting in July 2017, a diagnostic stewardship was enacted in our institution requiring the ordering provider to answer a series of questions within the electronic medical record before ordering a C. difficile toxin test. The charts were reviewed for all solid organ transplant recipients on whom a test was ordered between January 2016 and September 2019. Results: Orders for C. difficile toxin per quarter significantly decreased in the postintervention era (18 vs 8.5, P = .038). Median cost of inpatient treatment and days of therapy per thousand patient days was significantly lower in the postintervention era (median cost, $2,944.55 vs $416.92; P = .01) (days of therapy per thousand patient days, 521.9 vs 300.5; P < .01). Quarterly rates of negative tests were similar between the pre- and postintervention eras (65% vs 73%, P = .38). Conclusions: Although no orders were blocked based on the responses, this multilevel intervention was associated with a 47% decrease in C. difficile testing without effecting the rate of negative testing. These results suggest that we have achieved significant cost savings, in testing and isolation, without sacrificing critical aspects of clinical care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)605-609
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation proceedings
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

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