A differential DNA methylome signature of pulmonary immune cells from individuals converting to latent tuberculosis infection

Lovisa Karlsson, Jyotirmoy Das, Moa Nilsson, Amanda Tyrén, Isabelle Pehrson, Nina Idh, Shumaila Sayyab, Jakob Paues, Cesar Ugarte-Gil, Melissa Méndez-Aranda, Maria Lerm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, spreads via aerosols and the first encounter with the immune system is with the pulmonary-resident immune cells. The role of epigenetic regulations in the immune cells is emerging and we have previously shown that macrophages capacity to kill M. tuberculosis is reflected in the DNA methylome. The aim of this study was to investigate epigenetic modifications in alveolar macrophages and T cells in a cohort of medical students with an increased risk of TB exposure, longitudinally. DNA methylome analysis revealed that a unique DNA methylation profile was present in healthy subjects who later developed latent TB during the study. The profile was reflected in a different overall DNA methylation distribution as well as a distinct set of differentially methylated genes (DMGs). The DMGs were over-represented in pathways related to metabolic reprogramming of macrophages and T cell migration and IFN-γ production, pathways previously reported important in TB control. In conclusion, we identified a unique DNA methylation signature in individuals, with no peripheral immune response to M. tuberculosis antigen who later developed latent TB. Together the study suggests that the DNA methylation status of pulmonary immune cells can reveal who will develop latent TB infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number19418
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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