A case series of successful abdominal closure utilizing a novel technique combining a mechanical closure system with a biologic xenograft that accelerates wound healing

Yana Puckett, Beatrice Caballero, Virginia Tran, Michelle Estrada, Shirley McReynolds, Robyn E. Richmond, Catherine A. Ronaghan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the acute setting, once intra-abdominal injuries have been addressed, the next great hurdle is restoring a functional and intact abdominal compartment. The short and long-term consequences of living with a chronically open abdominal compartment include pulmonary, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, and emotional disability. The closure of catastrophic open abdomens presents a challenge to the surgeon. We present a technique utilizing a mechanical abdominal closure device in conjunction with biologic xenograft in closing complex open abdomens. This technique offers another option for definitive fascial closure and accelerated wound healing in this difficult patient population. The dynamic tissue system (DTS) is installed after control of original intraabdominal pathology. A porcine urinary bladder matrix (PUBM) is then placed in the subcutaneous space once fascial closure is achieved. Overall, primary myofascial closure was achieved in 100% of patients at a mean of 9.36 days.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere57154
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2019
Issue number149
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ABRA
  • Abdominal compartment syndrome
  • Abdominal wall closure
  • Biologic xenograft
  • Issue 149
  • Medicine
  • Open abdomen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Neuroscience
  • General Chemical Engineering
  • General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
  • General Immunology and Microbiology

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